Dietary Guidelines Report Identifies Synergy of Obesity and Covid19’s Worst Outcomes

Dietary Guidelines Report Identifies Synergy of Obesity and Covid19’s Worst Outcomes

The new 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines Scientific Report compiled by the Guidelines Advisory Committee was posted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) on July 14, 2020. The Report identified a synergistic effect between the most serious outcomes of COVID-19 and obesity and diet-related chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The report will be used by policymakers to craft the final guidelines, which will be published before the end of the year. A public meeting will be held Aug. 11 to discuss this report and its recommendations.

As the 2020 Committee submits its report and the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are prepared, we are in the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic. As more is learned about infection by SARS-Co V-2 and the development of COVID19, it is clear that it has significant nutritional implications. These parallel epidemics, one noninfectious (obesity and diet-related chronic diseases) and one infectious (COVID-19), appear to be synergistic. Those at most risk for the most serious outcomes of COVID-19, including hospitalization and death, are people afflicted by diet-related chronic diseases (obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease). These chronic diseases are often lumped into the term “underlying conditions” when reported by the media.

“The Committee found strong evidence that, in adults, a core dietary pattern characterized as higher in vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, whole grains, lean meats and seafood, appropriate dairy foods, and unsaturated vegetable oils, while being lower in red and processed meats, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol, and beverages and foods with added sugars is associated with reduced risk of all-causes of mortality,” the report says.
The report will be used by policymakers to use as they craft the final guidelines, which will be published before the end of the year. A public meeting will be held Aug. 11 to discuss this report and its recommendations.

The committee, made up of doctors, scientists, dietitians and other medical professionals, compiled the 835-page scientific report by looking through research — more than 1,500 primary research documents — and taking public commentary, both online and through public meetings. The guidelines, which are published by USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, are updated every five years.The new 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines Scientific Report


Older Post Newer Post